2 Principles Of Data Backup That Save $12,500 Per Hour

The 2 Principles of Data Backup that Save You $12,500 per Hour

According to a recent survey of over 2,000 SMBs, the average cost per hour of a data center outage is $12,500 for a SMB organization, and up to $60,000 per hour for a mid-sized enterprise. The report also indicates that less than 20% of SMBs back up all of their data, with 88% of businesses having lost critical data within the last two years. This of course doesn’t include businesses that are scheduling backups but have never tried to restore data.

Even in these instances, many organizations are unsure if these backups are valid until they receive an audit or need to restore data outside of their internal backup policy.

Here are the only 2 data backup principles you need to follow: [Read more…]

Why Data Backup And Recovery Systems Are Like Your Insurance Policy

 

Your data backup and recovery systems are like your insurance policy. Knowing that you have a process and system in place to ensure your data is secure and recoverable quickly and reliably means you can sleep at night knowing that your valuable corporate assets are safe.

But wait, have you tested your tape backup lately? If you have legacy tape backup systems in place – can they cope with the demands of a consolidated and virtualized infrastructure? How about the expanding volume of data growing exponentially year over year?

Challenges of a Tape Back-up Environment

Tape has long been the baseline backup medium used by most businesses, but with the arrival of consolidated infrastructures and virtualized environments the demands on legacy systems may be too complex or costly to manage depending on the types of applications and recovery point objectives in scope for the back-up. [Read more…]

Ding, dong, the tape is dead: new storage systems handle both backup and archive

It was clear when DVDs hit the market back in the 1990s that they offered a richer movie viewing experience than VHS tapes. But for a time, tapes and VCRs were cheaper so we had to wait for the cost of DVD players to come down – and for the word to spread – before the new technology overtook the old.

It’s been a bit more complicated for IT departments to decide whether or when to switch from tapes to disk for their data backup and archiving strategy. Partly because, historically, tapes were higher density and cheaper than disk and because tapes were considered safer against loss, corruption or disaster. But using tapes often also meant dealing with poor recovery times, copying dozens of copies of the same document. Disks for their part got more dense, faster and less expensive. Not to mention that new disks could usually be added through cheap storage arrays or servers, while more tape usually meant a bureaucracy tape infrastructure – more towers, more robots and more tape drives. Still, in the mid-2000s, with all the advances working in disks’ favor, some believed that tape was undergoing a renaissance, pulling away again due to capacity limitations for disk. The result? A cold war truce of sorts between the two technologies – long-term archiving to tape, shorter-term backups to disk. [Read more…]