Manage servers in your sleep.

Further reducing routine maintenance of your environment with dynamic provisioning and automation.

 In the last post, I likened the virtualized application model to an organism of sorts, where each individual component can work together virtually as a dynamic pool of resources. But what happens when something isn’t working as it should?

 Well, that’s really where the next logical step in your organization’s virtualization evolution comes in, one central management console that understands all the pieces plugged in – in essence, one single point to look at where you can automate and resolve issues and reduce routine maintenance of your environment, what we call: dynamic provisioning and automation.

 For instance, say a server turns off in the middle of the night. Where you are already in your virtualization evolution, you’ve written the required rules to ensure that your applications move through or are taken over by other functioning parts of your organism, other servers, and they continue to run like before. This sort of automation ensures that you won’t have to do anything immediately. You may get notified so that first thing in the morning you can have a look at the physical environment and do some troubleshooting via your central console, but you essentially bypass the usual human remediation process and let the software handle the issue for you.

 The same goes for provisioning the amount of resources needed for any given application to run on a server. [Read more…]