Everything you need to know about SQL Server 2016

Everything you need to know about SQL Server 2016

Microsoft SQL 2005 is going EOL on April 12, 2016, and the all-new SQL Server 2016 stands to bring the biggest, most exciting changes to SQL since its inception. Our Microsoft team recently hosted a private webinar for some of our best Microsoft clients, and shared their perspectives on what to expect with the new platform.

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What running Windows Server 2003 will cost you after July 14th 2015

What running Windows Server 2003 will cost you after July 14th 2015

It’s game over for those running Windows Server 2003 after July 14th.

It is critical that all organizations understand the financial risk and impact of running instances of Microsoft Windows Server 2003 in production after July 14th, 2015. That’s when the decade old server operating system goes end of support.

Windows Server 2003 going end of life means no more support. Period.

End of support means Microsoft won’t be issuing any new security patches, like the 37 critical updates they issued in 2013. And despite what some folks think, virtualized servers are still vulnerable to threats.

Organizations who continue to run Windows Server 2003 once it goes EOL will fail compliance audits. This is particularly relevant for organizations who are regulated by HIPAA, PCI, SOX, Dodd-Frank and others.

Are you ready for the financial cost of continuing to support Windows Server 2003?

Softchoice estimates it may cost organizations $200,000 or more per year to cover Windows Server 2003 with extended support in order to remain compliant.

You’re not alone. Softchoice will help.

Engage your Softchoice Account Manager – before it’s too late! Softchoice offers a wide variety of assessment-led solutions that will ensure your transition away from Windows Server 2003 is manageable and affordable.

4 Things to Do Once You’ve Migrated Away from Windows XP

4 Things to Do Once You've Migrated Away from Windows XP

You’ve completed your migration away from Windows XP to Windows 7 or 8 — now what? One thing we know for sure: the industry has evolved and it isn’t reasonable to expect we will stay on this version of the OS for the next ten years. It was a good run. Let’s move on.

You’ll know an IT project is complete when another one is starting
A new model of OS updates calls for regular and consistent updates. No more waiting for service packs. No more waiting for R2. The updates will be regular and rich. We will want them. Our users will demand them. A new system of devices from tablets, to the Microsoft Surface, to our trusty iOS devices to stuff that hasn’t even been thought up yet will capture the imagination of our users and deliver heartburn to the IT manager. Deep breaths. The features available to our new spectrum of devices are changing…frequently…and our users will no longer tolerate a decade of treading water. We need to supply a better desktop experience.

The emergence of the consumerization of IT and BYOD philosophies has led to a proliferation of devices, and these enable capabilities that simply weren’t possible with XP. This means new ideas are required to keep some control and sanity. That is, however, unless you are have been awarded a gigantic budget increase and a ton of extra head count to help you manage the new stuff that is rolling our week after week.

If you have a huge budget increase and a slew of new people to hire in IT to help you, stop reading. Good job. You are in great shape. SneakerNet will serve you, and your ridiculously growing budget will serve you well for the foreseeable future. Nice work. Well played.

For the rest of us, with slashed budgets and shrinking staff counts, let’s see what we can do.

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Why An Easy Migration From Windows XP Includes SCCM

migration

The software delivery model is fundamentally changing. We’re not seeing big-splash releases anymore. Instead, we’re seeing a continuous deployment stream of updates, upgrades and patches.

With the death of Windows XP it doesn’t really matter if you’re moving to Windows 7 or 8 — just as long as you’re moving forward. Which OS you choose depends on which version best fits your needs. Factors that should be top of mind include which OS will be less of a shock to your users, and which version your app vendors will be able to support.

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Why the death of Windows XP is a blessing in disguise

XP End of Life

The death of Windows XP has been a long time coming. If you’re in denial or you’ve been prolonging the pain of migrating to the next version of Windows, it’s time to face the music: XP has reached its end of life.

This means more than a standard desktop OS upgrade (possibly one you’ve been putting off for the past five years). It’s going to touch almost every aspect of your IT infrastructure.

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As Support For Windows XP Ends, A Majority Of PCs Still Run The Aging OS

Retirement

As the clock ticks down to the end of Windows XP support, a majority of business machines are still running the aging operating system, suggests a new Softchoice-led study.

Sixty-two percent of desktops and laptops continue to operate on Windows XP or older operating systems, according to aggregate data gathered from over 620,000 PC’s of hundreds of Softchoice clients. Just 38 percent of surveyed machines were running a newer OS, including Windows 7 and to a lesser extent, Vista.

Although this is an improvement from last year (a previous Softchoice study showed that as of August 2011, 71% of PC’s still ran XP), the new numbers indicate two thirds of North American businesses are running an OS that will soon be obsolete, as Microsoft plans to cease support for XP as of April 2014.

In November, Softchoice will kick off its latest Discovery Series, an informative seminar hosted by our team of Microsoft experts where we’ll explore the business challenges of upgrading – and the real value of Windows 8.

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