Addressing Bring Your Own Technology

addressingbyod

How to implement a Bring Your Own Technology strategy is still one of the most rampant conversations we have everyday with businesses. There is no single technology that is going to make the implementation successful. The goal of this guide is to outline the variables that need to be addressed so that you can find an approach that will best fit your organization.

There are a few reasons organizations choose to have users bring their own technology.  The first step in figuring out what to do about BYO is to figure out why you are doing it. What’s interesting is that as time goes I’m finding that people aren’t really sure if they are trying to enable BYO or prevent it. Either way this guide will have you covered. [Read more…]

Supporting BYOD: Is It Time for Your Help Desk to Draw the Line?

Supporting BYOD: Is It Time for Your Help Desk to Draw the Line?

One of the promises of BYOD is that it reduces help desk tickets, which allows IT to spend less time fixing problems and more time driving business value.

However, as more employees bring their own devices to work, IT departments are seeing an increase in tickets. These tickets – which cover everything from device compatibility to security – increase the burden on already overworked support teams.

Does this mean it’s time for your help desk to draw the line when it comes to supporting BYOD?

[Read more…]

Mastering the BYOD Balancing Act: The Softchoice Journey

Balancing Act

It’s funny how things evolve so quickly. Just a few years ago, the thought of employees using their own phones or laptops for work at work was unthinkable.

But as the consumerization of IT trend grows from a trickle to a flood, many organizations have no choice but consider how to implement a Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) program. And the experience at Softchoice was no different.

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7 Technologies That Make BYOD a Reality

seven technologies to enable a BYOD strategy

Let’s start with the obvious.

There is no silver bullet, one-size-fits-all checklist for creating the perfect Bring Your Own Device strategy. Every organization is completely different.

But it’s not as bad as it sounds. Many of the technologies necessary to support a strategy are probably already in your ecosystem. It’s just a matter of knowing what’s missing, and how to leverage what you’ve already got.

To give you a hand, we’ve assembled seven tools and technologies that make planning and executing your BYOD strategy a reality.

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Take The Guesswork Out of Your Mobile Network

Take the guesswork out of your mobile network

Depending on your organization, BYOD means a lot of different things. BYOD can be a welcome change (employee retention, talent acquisition, employee satisfaction, productivity enhancement, lower IT costs, and potentially customer satisfaction) or a challenge (security, access/restriction of data, lost devices, etc).

Regardless, the first step is knowing the who’s, what’s and where’s of your network. The Softchoice Mobility TechCheck gives you visibility into how many devices and what kind of devices are already on your network.

With this data, companies can start to develop a plan around BYOD, such as:

  • Should companies provide freedom of choice or restrict choice to specific devices/operating systems
  • Should companies provide a stipend for the device or service
  • What does an acceptable use document look like in a BYOD world
  • What data/applications should a company allow access to …where …when …to whom

I’m holding a special mobile security webinar in December to answer your questions – read on for full details on this and our assessment.

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The Winchester Mystery House – Don’t Let It Happen To You!

The Winchester Mystery House - Don't let it happen to you
Recently Stephen Speirs from Cisco wrote a blog post about The Winchester House, as an analogy to explain how IT often evolves in unplanned ways.

I’d like to extend Stephen’s analogy a little further by using the Winchester House as an example of what can happen when organizations over time continually enhance and upgrade their infrastructure without proper planning and foresight.

But first, what is the Winchester House? The Winchester Mystery House, located in San Jose, California, was the residence of Sarah Winchester, the widow of gun maker William Winchester. Sarah was obsessed with building out the house and so arranged for construction around the clock, from 1884 until her death in 1922.  Construction costs were estimated at about US $5.5 million in 1922; equivalent to over $75 million today.

The house’s real claim to fame however, isn’t the construction; it’s the complete lack of any master building plan. The house has 160 rooms, 24,000 square feet, 10,000 windows, 2,000 doors, 6 kitchens, 40 bedrooms, 13 bathrooms, and 47 fireplaces. Sixty-five of the house’s doors lead to blank walls, 13 staircases lead nowhere, 24 skylights are covered by floors.

So how does this relate to IT?

[Read more…]